Graduate Education

Haagen Klaus, Mason anthropology professor
Graduate Student Life
Graduate Student Life

Graduate Student Life provides Mason graduate students with a community while helping them with professional and personal development. The department connects graduate students to campus resources and identifies and advocates for their needs.

Returning to school for a graduate degree often means making tough choices. While the rewards are tangible, the sacrifices are real. The Office of Graduate Education will be there from the time a student first expresses an interest in studying at Mason to the moment they walk across the stage to obtain a degree.

The mission of the Mason Graduate Education Office is to enable students to achieve their personal and career goals by supporting advanced learning, research and scholarly study, enhancing professional development, and promoting well-being. 

Our office, in partnership with academic unit leaders and the Graduate Council, will provide students with an education of the highest caliber, and the services they need to take full advantage of it.

We'll help them find financial support, be it a grant, a fellowship, or a position as a graduate assistant or lecturer.

As they join Mason's community of scholars and researchers, Graduate Student Life will help them find a life outside the classroom and lab.

And during their time here, we'll help them develop the professional skills and connections needed to establish a thriving career.

Access Previous Graduate Council Agendas and Minutes

It may occasionally be necessary to look up historical information about when, why, and how a program, course, or degree changed. Previous agendas and minutes of the George Mason University Graduate Council are arranged in a directory in a public Blackboard folder. For additional information, please contact the Office of Accreditation and Program integrity at oapi@gmu.edu.

Search the Archive

Graduate student Rebecca Ijiti attends classes at the Arlington Campus. Graduate courses there are held in the evening so students can work toward an advanced degree while still employed.

Graduate student Rebecca Ijiti attends classes at the Arlington Campus. Graduate courses there are held in the evening so students can work toward an advanced degree while still employed.