Vision Series

The Mason Vision Series is a forum for Mason researchers and scholars to share their work with both university colleagues and the community more generally. It is an opportunity for invited Mason faculty members to share the frontiers of their scholarship in an accessible style that also inspires lively discussion among students, faculty, staff, and the wider reaches of the community. This semester, the series will be held virtually and will be live streamed through GMU-TV, offering those across our community an opportunity to join and engage with faculty. To watch the events at a later date, click on the title links. Subject and speaker details are in the section below the chart.

 

DATE TITLE SPEAKER RSVP
Feb. 22
 
A Vision for American Policing Reform
(Click on link above to watch the recorded event)
Dr. Cynthia Lum  
March 22
 
COVID-19: A Vision for Future Response
(Click on link above to watch the recorded event)
Dr. Amira Roess  
April 19
7:00 - 8:15 PM

A Decade Beyond the Arab Spring:
New Challenges for U.S. Foreign Policy in the Middle East

Dr. Peter Mandaville RSVP

 

A Vision for American Policing Reform

Event Description
The last two decades of policing in the United States have been marked with both turmoil and calls for reform. In her presentation, Professor Cynthia Lum will lay out her vision for reinventing American policing. Reflecting on many contemporary law enforcement challenges, she will argue that re-envisioning policing will require police officers and leaders to take a more scientific and intellectual approach to match the complexities and demands of both the profession and the communities for which they are accountable.

 

Dr. Cynthia Lum
Dr. Cynthia Lum

About Dr. Lum
Dr. Cynthia Lum is professor of criminology, law and society in Mason’s College of Humanities and Social Sciences, and director of Mason’s Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy. She is a leading authority on evidence-based policing, an approach which advocates that research, evaluation and scientific processes should have “a seat at the table” in law enforcement policymaking and practice. She has developed numerous tools and strategies to translate and institutionalize research into everyday law enforcement operations, and is the founding editor of Translational Criminology Magazine. Dr. Lum is a member of the Committee on Law and Justice at the National Academies of Sciences (NAS) and an appointed member of NAS’s Transportation Research Board Standing Committee on Traffic Law Enforcement. She is a Board Director for the National Police Foundation and a member of the Research Advisory Committee for the International Association of Chiefs of Police. Dr. Lum has served numerous elected and appointed positions within the American Society of Criminology and is Co-Editor in Chief of Criminology & Public Policy, the society’s flagship policy journal. Professor Lum is a former police officer and detective.

March 22: COVID-19: A Vision for Future Response

Event Description
In her presentation “COVID-19: A Vision for Future Response”, Dr. Amira Roess will break her remarks into three sections: Messaging and Lessons Learned; the Political Divide; and Moving Forward. She will highlight common mistakes around communications, identify the United States’ lack of response and research infrastructure to COVID-19, explain how politicizing the virus and vaccine have caused distrust of the medical community, and outline what we as a nation can do better moving forward.

 

Dr. Amira Roess
Dr. Amira Roess

About Dr. Roess
Dr. Amira Roess is a professor of
Global and Community Health at George Mason University's College of Health and Human Services, Department of Global and Community Health. She is an epidemiologist with expertise in infectious diseases epidemiology, multi-disciplinary and multi-species field research and evaluating interventions to reduce the transmission and impact of infectious diseases. Dr. Roess holds a PhD in global disease epidemiology and control from Johns Hopkins University. Her current studies are in the US, Bangladesh, Egypt, and Ethiopia. Prior to joining academia, Dr. Roess served as the Science Director for the Pew Commission on Industrial Food Animal Production at Johns Hopkins, and was an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) officer at the CDC. She has served as consultant for the United States Agency for International Development, the World Bank, and Westat Inc. She has a master degree from the UMDNJ/ Rutgers University School of Public Health.

April 19: A Decade Beyond the Arab Spring: New Challenges for U.S. Foreign Policy in the Middle East

Event Description
2021 marks the 10th anniversary of a political earthquake in the Middle East, the popular uprisings that toppled authoritarian regimes in countries such as Egypt and Tunisia but which also set in motion a chain of events that produced devastating civil wars in Syria, Libya, and Yemen—not to mention the rise of ISIS. These dramatic developments upended much of the conventional wisdom underpinning U.S. foreign policy in the region. How should we think about the new calculus of American engagement with the Middle East and the challenges lying ahead?

New tensions have emerged with longstanding U.S. allies such as Saudi Arabia, Israel, and Turkey; Iran continues to be a challenge; and broader shifts in global order see rising powers such as Russia and China pursuing their own strategies in the Middle East. A clear vision and roadmap for American diplomacy in the region seems increasingly difficult to discern.

Drawing on his regional expertise as well as his experience as a U.S. government official advising two former Secretaries of State, Schar School professor Peter Mandaville will explore some of the key questions and issues facing the new U.S. administration as it determines how best to navigate emerging challenges in the Middle East.
 

Dr. Peter Mandaville

About Dr. Mandaville
Dr. Peter Mandaville is Professor of International Affairs in the Schar School of Policy & Government and Director of the Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies, both at George Mason University. He is also a Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution and Senior Research Fellow at Georgetown University’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace & World Affairs. From 2011-12 he was a member of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s Policy Planning Staff where he was involved in shaping the U.S. response to the Arab Spring. From 2015-16 he served as a Senior Advisor in the Secretary of State’s Office of Religion & Global Affairs where he acted as the U.S. Department of State’s primary subject matter expert on Islam. Previous affiliations have included the Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) and the Pew Research Center. He is the author of the books Islam & Politics (3rd edition, 2020) and Transnational Muslim Politics: Reimagining the Umma (2001) in addition to several co-edited books, many journal articles, book chapters, and op-ed/commentary pieces in outlets such as Foreign Affairs, the International Herald TribuneThe GuardianThe Atlantic Online and Foreign Policy. He has testified multiple times before the U.S. Congress on topics including political Islam, U.S. counterterrorism policy, and human rights in the Middle East. His research has been supported by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Social Science Research Council, the British Council, and the Henry Luce Foundation.